How Much Exercise

Kids (ages 6-17)

Children and adolescents should engage in physical activity 60 minutes (1 hour) or more each day. Talk to your child’s doctor before he or she begins any new exercise program.

  • Aerobic activity should make up most of your child’s 60 or more minutes of physical activity each day. This can include either moderate-intensity aerobic activity, such as brisk walking, or vigorous-intensity activity, such as running. Be sure to include vigorous-intensity aerobic activity on at least 3 days per week.
  • Include muscle strengthening activities, such as gymnastics or push-ups, at least 3 days per week as part of your child’s 60 or more minutes.
  • Include bone strengthening activities, such as jumping rope or running, at least 3 days per week as part of your child’s 60 or more minutes.

Adults (ages 18-64)

Adults need 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity weekly, or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity aerobic activity weekly, or an equivalent mix of moderate and vigorous intensity exercise each week. Talk to your doctor before you begin any new exercise program.

Determining your intensity:

Moderate:
While performing the activity your breathing and heart rate are noticeably elevated, but you can still carry on a conversation.
Examples: Walking briskly (a 15 minute mile), light yard work, light snow shoveling, actively playing with children, biking at a casual pace.

Vigorous:
Your heart rate is greatly elevated and are breathing too hard and quickly to have a conversation.
Examples: Jogging, swimming laps, cross-country skiing, most other competitive sports (basketball, tennis, etc.)

Older Adults (age 65 and older)

Older adults need 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity weekly, or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity aerobic activity weekly, or an equivalent mix of moderate and vigorous intensity exercise each week. Talk to your doctor before you begin any new exercise program.

Determining your intensity:

Moderate:
While performing the activity your breathing and heart rate are noticeably elevated, but you can still carry on a conversation.
Examples: Walking briskly (a 15 minute mile), light yard work, light snow shoveling, actively playing with children, biking at a casual pace.

Vigorous:
Your heart rate is greatly elevated and are breathing too hard and quickly to have a conversation.
Examples: Jogging, swimming laps, cross-country skiing, most other competitive sports (basketball, tennis, etc.)

Source: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/physical_activity/

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